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# localclient.cfg - configuration file for a LOCAL Xymon client.
#
# By default, Xymon clients send raw data to the Xymon server,
# which in turn converts the data into status messages.
# In that case, THIS FILE IS NOT USED and you should IGNORE it.
#
# If you want to configure clients locally (on the server that the
# client runs one), you do it here. You MUST also change the
# clientlaunch.cfg file and add the "--local" option to the
# command launching xymonclient.sh
#
# The file defines a series of rules:
#    UP     : Changes the "cpu" status when the system has rebooted recently,
#             or when it has been running for too long.
#    LOAD   : Changes the "cpu" status according to the system load.
#    CLOCK  : Changes the "cpu" status if the client system clock is
#             not synchronized with the clock of the Xymon server.
#    DISK   : Changes the "disk" status, depending on the amount of space
#             used of filesystems.
#    MEMPHYS: Changes the "memory" status, based on the percentage of real
#             memory used.
#    MEMACT : Changes the "memory" status, based on the percentage of "actual"
#             memory used. Note: Not all systems report an "actual" value.
#    MEMSWAP: Changes the "memory" status, based on the percentage of swap
#             space used.
#    PROC   : Changes the "procs" status according to which processes were found
#             in the "ps" listing from the client.
#    LOG    : Changes the "msgs" status according to entries in text-based logfiles.
#             Note: The "client-local.cfg" file controls which logfiles the client will report.
#    FILE   : Changes the "files" status according to meta-data for files.
#             Note: The "client-local.cfg" file controls which files the client will report.
#    DIR    : Changes the "files" status according to the size of a directory.
#             Note: The "client-local.cfg" file controls which directories the client will report.
#    PORT   : Changes the "ports" status according to which tcp ports were found
#             in the "netstat" listing from the client.
#    DEFAULT: Set the default values that apply if no other rules match.
#
# All rules can be qualified so they apply only to certain hosts, or on certain
# times of the day (see below).
#
# Each type of rule takes a number of parameters:
#    UP bootlimit toolonglimit
#             The cpu status goes yellow if the system has been up for less than
#             "bootlimit" time, or longer than "toolonglimit". The time is in
#             minutes, or you can add h/d/w for hours/days/weeks - eg. "2h" for
#             two hours, or "4w" for 4 weeks.
#             Defaults: bootlimit=1h, toolonglimit=-1 (infinite).
#
#    LOAD warnlevel paniclevel
#             If the system load exceeds "warnlevel" or "paniclevel", the "cpu"
#             status will go yellow or red, respectively. These are decimal
#             numbers.
#             Defaults: warnlevel=5.0, paniclevel=10.0
#
#    CLOCK maximum-offset
#             If the system clock of the client differs from that of the Xymon
#             server by more than "maximum-offset" seconds, then the CPU status
#             column will go yellow. Note that the accuracy of this test is limited,
#             since it is affected by the time it takes a client status report to
#             go from the client to the Xymon server and be processed. You should
#             therefore allow for a few seconds (5-10) of slack when you define
#             your max. offset.
#             It is not wise to use this test, unless your servers are synchronized
#             to a common clock, e.g. through NTP.
#
#    DISK filesystem warnlevel paniclevel
#    DISK filesystem IGNORE
#             If the utilization of "filesystem" is reported to exceed "warnlevel"
#             or "paniclevel", the "disk" status will go yellow or red, respectively.
#             "warnlevel" and "paniclevel" are either the percentage used, or the
#             space available as reported by the local "df" command on the host.
#             For the latter type of check, the "warnlevel" must be followed by the
#             letter "U", e.g. "1024U".
#             The special keyword "IGNORE" causes this filesystem to be ignored
#             completely, i.e. it will not appear in the "disk" status column and
#             it will not be tracked in a graph. This is useful for e.g. removable
#             devices, backup-disks and similar hardware.
#             "filesystem" is the mount-point where the filesystem is mounted, e.g.
#             "/usr" or "/home". A filesystem-name that begins with "%" is interpreted
#             as a Perl-compatible regular expression; e.g. "%^/oracle.*/" will match
#             any filesystem whose mountpoint begins with "/oracle".
#             Defaults: warnlevel=90%, paniclevel=95%
#
#    MEMPHYS warnlevel paniclevel
#    MEMACT warnlevel paniclevel
#    MEMSWAP warnlevel paniclevel
#             If the memory utilization exceeds the "warnlevel" or "paniclevel", the
#             "memory" status will change to yellow or red, respectively.
#             Note: The words "PHYS", "ACT" and "SWAP" are also recognized.
#             Defaults: MEMPHYS warnlevel=100 paniclevel=101 (i.e. it will never go red)
#                       MEMSWAP warnlevel=50 paniclevel=80
#                       MEMACT  warnlevel=90 paniclevel=97
#
#    PROC processname minimumcount maximumcount color [TRACK=id] [TEXT=displaytext]
#             The "ps" listing sent by the client will be scanned for how many
#             processes containing "processname" are running, and this is then
#             matched against the min/max settings defined here. If the running
#             count is outside the thresholds, the color of the "procs" status
#             changes to "color".
#             To check for a process that must NOT be running: Set minimum and 
#             maximum to 0.
#
#             "processname" can be a simple string, in which case this string must
#             show up in the "ps" listing as a command. The scanner will find
#             a ps-listing of e.g. "/usr/sbin/cron" if you only specify "processname"
#             as "cron".
#             "processname" can also be a Perl-compatiable regular expression, e.g.
#             "%java.*inst[0123]" can be used to find entries in the ps-listing for
#             "java -Xmx512m inst2" and "java -Xmx256 inst3". In that case, 
#             "processname" must begin with "%" followed by the reg.expression.
#             If "processname" contains whitespace (blanks or TAB), you must enclose
#             the full string in double quotes - including the "%" if you use regular
#             expression matching. E.g.
#                 PROC "%xymond_channel --channel=data.*xymond_rrd" 1 1 yellow
#             or
#                 PROC "java -DCLASSPATH=/opt/java/lib" 2 5
#
#             You can have multiple "PROC" entries for the same host, all of the
#             checks are merged into the "procs" status and the most severe
#             check defines the color of the status.
#
#             The TRACK=id option causes the number of processes found to be recorded
#             in an RRD file, with "id" as part of the filename. This graph will then
#             appear on the "procs" page as well as on the "trends" page. Note that
#             "id" must be unique among the processes tracked for each host.
#
#             The TEXT=displaytext option affects how the process appears on the
#             "procs" status page. By default, the process is listed with the
#             "processname" as identification, but if this is a regular expression
#             it may be a bit difficult to understand. You can then use e.g.
#             "TEXT=Apache" to make these processes appear with the name "Apache"
#             instead.
#
#             Defaults: mincount=1, maxcount=-1 (unlimited), color="red".
#                       Note: No processes are checked by default.
#
#             Example: Check that "cron" is running:
#                 PROC cron
#             Example: Check that at least 5 "httpd" processes are running, but
#             not more than 20:
#                 PROC httpd 5 20
#
#    LOG filename match-pattern [COLOR=color] [IGNORE=ignore-pattern] [TEXT=displaytext]
#             In the "client-local.cfg" file, you can list any number of files
#             that the client will collect log data from. These are sent to the
#             Xymon server together with the other client data, and you can then
#             choose how to analyze the log data with LOG entries.
#
#                             ************ IMPORTANT ***************
#             To monitor a logfile, you *MUST* configure both client-local.cfg
#             and analysis.cfg. If you configure only the client-local.cfg
#             file, the client will collect the log data and you can view it in 
#             the "client data" display, but it will not affect the color of the
#             "msgs" status. On the other hand, if you configure only the
#             analysis.cfg file, then there will be no log data to inspect,
#             and you will not see any updates of the "msgs" status either.
#
#             "filename" is a filename or pattern. The set of files reported by
#             the client is matched against "filename", and if they match then
#             this LOG entry is processed against the data from a file.
#
#             "match-pattern": The log data is matched against this pattern. If
#             there is a match, this log file causes a status change to "color".
#
#             "ignore-pattern": The log data that matched "match-pattern" is also
#             matched against "ignore-pattern". If the data matches the "ignore-pattern",
#             this line of data does not affect the status color. In other words,
#             the "ignore-pattern" can be used to refine the strings which cause
#             a match.
#             Note: The "ignore-pattern" is optional.
#
#             "color": The color which this match will trigger.
#             Note: "color" is optional, if omitted then "red" will be used.
#
#             Example: Go yellow if the text "WARNING" shows up in any logfile.
#                 LOG %.* WARNING COLOR=yellow
#
#             Example: Go red if the text "I/O error" or "read error" appears.
#                 LOG %/var/(adm|log)/messages %(I/O|read).error COLOR=red
#
#    FILE filename [color] [things to check] [TRACK]
#             NB: The files you wish to monitor must be listed in a "file:..."
#             entry in the client-local.cfg file, in order for the client to 
#             report any data about them.
#
#             "filename" is a filename or pattern. The set of files reported by
#             the client is matched against "filename", and if they match then
#             this FILE entry is processed against the data from that file.
#
#             [things to check] can be one or more of the following:
#             - "NOEXIST" triggers a warning if the file exists. By default,
#               a warning is triggered for files that have a FILE entry, but
#               which do not exist.
#             - "TYPE=type" where "type" is one of "file", "dir", "char", "block", 
#               "fifo", or "socket". Triggers warning if the file is not of the
#               specified type.
#             - "OWNERID=owner" and "GROUPID=group" triggers a warning if the owner
#               or group does not match what is listed here. "owner" and "group" is
#               specified either with the numeric uid/gid, or the user/group name.
#             - "MODE=mode" triggers a warning if the file permissions are not
#               as listed. "mode" is written in the standard octal notation, e.g.
#               "644" for the rw-r--r-- permissions.
#             - "SIZE<max.size" and "SIZE>min.size" triggers a warning it the file
#               size is greater than "max.size" or less than "min.size", respectively.
#               You can append "K" (KB), "M" (MB), "G" (GB) or "T" (TB) to the size.
#               If there is no such modifier, KB is assumed.
#               E.g. to warn if a file grows larger than 1MB (1024 KB): "SIZE<1M".
#             - "SIZE=size" triggers a warning it the file size is not what is listed.
#             - "MTIME>min.mtime" and "MTIME<max.mtime" checks how long ago the file
#               was last modified (in seconds). E.g. to check if a file was updated
#               within the past 10 minutes (600 seconds): "MTIME<600". Or to check 
#               that a file has NOT been updated in the past 24 hours: "MTIME>86400".
#             - "MTIME=timestamp" checks if a file was last modified at "timestamp".
#               "timestamp" is a unix epoch time (seconds since midnight Jan 1 1970 UTC).
#             - "CTIME>min.ctime", "CTIME<max.ctime", "CTIME=timestamp" acts as the
#               mtime checks, but for the ctime timestamp (when the files' directory
#               entry was last changed, eg. by chown, chgrp or chmod).
#             - "MD5=md5sum", "SHA1=sha1sum", "RMD160=rmd160sum" trigger a warning 
#               if the file checksum using the MD5, SHA1 or RMD160 message digest
#               algorithms do not match the one configured here. Note: The "file"
#               entry in the client-local.cfg file must specify which algorithm to use.
#
#             "TRACK" causes the size of this file to be tracked in an RRD file, and
#             shown on the graph on the "files" display.
#
#             Example: Check that the /var/log/messages file is not empty and was updated
#                      within the past 10 minutes, and go yellow if either fails:
#                 FILE /var/log/messages SIZE>0 MTIME<600 yellow
#
#             Example: Check the timestamp, size and SHA-1 hash of the /bin/sh program:
#                 FILE /bin/sh MTIME=1128514608 SIZE=645140 SHA1=5bd81afecf0eb93849a2fd9df54e8bcbe3fefd72
#
#    DIR directory [color] [SIZE<maxsize] [SIZE>minsize] [TRACK]
#             NB: The directories you wish to monitor must be listed in a "dir:..."
#             entry in the client-local.cfg file, in order for the client to 
#             report any data about them.
#
#             "directory" is a filename or pattern. The set of directories reported by
#             the client is matched against "directory", and if they match then
#             this DIR entry is processed against the data for that directory.
#
#             "SIZE<maxsize" and "SIZE>minsize" defines the size limits that the
#             directory must stay within. If it goes outside these limits, a warning
#             will trigger. Note the Xymon uses the raw number reported by the
#             local "du" command on the client. This is commonly KB, but it may be
#             disk blocks which are often 512 bytes.
#
#             "TRACK" causes the size of this directory to be tracked in an RRD file, 
#             and shown on the graph on the "files" display.
#
#    PORT [LOCAL=addr] [EXLOCAL=addr] [REMOTE=addr] [EXREMOTE=addr] [STATE=state] [EXSTATE=state] [min=mincount] [max=maxcount] [col=color] [TRACK=id] [TEXT=displaytext]
#             The "netstat" listing sent by the client will be scanned for how many
#             sockets match the criteria listed.
#             "addr" is a (partial) address specification in the format used on 
#             the output from netstat. This is typically "10.0.0.1:80" for the IP 
#             10.0.0.1, port 80. Or "*:80" for any local address, port 80.
#             NB: The Xymon clients normally report only the numeric data for
#                 IP-adresses and port-numbers, so you must specify the port
#                 number (e.g. "80") instead of the service name ("www").
#             "state" causes only the sockets in the specified state to be included;
#             it is usually LISTEN or ESTABLISHED.
#             The socket count is then matched against the min/max settings defined 
#             here. If the count is outside the thresholds, the color of the "ports" 
#             status changes to "color".
#             To check for a socket that must NOT exist: Set minimum and
#             maximum to 0.
#
#             "addr" and "state" can be a simple strings, in which case these string must 
#             show up in the "netstat" at the appropriate column.
#             "addr" and "state" can also be a Perl-compatiable regular expression, e.g.
#             "LOCAL=%(:80|:443)" can be used to find entries in the netstat local port for
#             both http (port 80) and https (port 443). In that case, portname or state must 
#             begin with "%" followed by the reg.expression.
#
#             The TRACK=id option causes the number of sockets found to be recorded
#             in an RRD file, with "id" as part of the filename. This graph will then
#             appear on the "ports" page as well as on the "trends" page. Note that
#             "id" must be unique among the ports tracked for each host.
#
#             The TEXT=displaytext option affects how the port appears on the
#             "ports" status page. By default, the port is listed with the
#             local/remote/state rules as identification, but this may be somewhat
#             difficult to understand. You can then use e.g. "TEXT=Secure Shell" to make 
#             these ports appear with the name "Secure Shell" instead.
#
#             Defaults: state="LISTEN", mincount=1, maxcount=-1 (unlimited), color="red".
#                       Note: No ports are checked by default.
#
#             Example: Check that there is someone listening on the https port:
#                 PORT "LOCAL=%([.:]443)$" state=LISTEN TEXT=https
#
#             Example: Check that at least 5 "ssh" connections are established, but
#             not more than 10; warn but do not error; graph the connection count:
#                 PORT "LOCAL=%([.:]22)$" state=ESTABLISHED min=5 max=20 color=yellow TRACK=ssh "TEXT=SSH logins"
#
#             Example: Check that ONLY ports 22, 80 and 443 are open for incoming connections:
#                 PORT STATE=LISTEN LOCAL=%0.0.0.0[.:].* EXLOCAL=%[.:](22|80|443)$ MAX=0 "TEXT=Bad listeners"
#
#
# To apply rules to specific hosts, you can use the "HOST=", "EXHOST=", "PAGE=" 
# "EXPAGE=", "CLASS=" or "EXCLASS=" qualifiers.  (These act just as in the 
# alerts.cfg file).
#
# Hostnames are either a comma-separated list of hostnames (from the hosts.cfg file), 
# "*" to indicate "all hosts", or a Perl-compatible regular expression.
# E.g. "HOST=dns.foo.com,www.foo.com" identifies two specific hosts; 
# "HOST=%www.*.foo.com EXHOST=www-test.foo.com" matches all hosts with a name
# beginning with "www", except the "www-test" host.
# "PAGE" and "EXPAGE" match the hostnames against the page on where they are
# located in the hosts.cfg file, via the hosts' page/subpage/subparent
# directives. This can be convenient to pick out all hosts on a specific page.
#
# Rules can be dependant on time-of-day, using the standard Xymon syntax 
# (the hosts.cfg(5) about the NKTIME parameter). E.g. "TIME=W:0800:2200"
# applied to a rule will make this rule active only on week-days between
# 8AM and 10PM.
#
# You can also associate a GROUP id with a rule. The group-id is passed to
# the alert module, which can then use it to control who gets an alert when
# a failure occurs. E.g. the following associates the "httpd" process check 
# with the "web" group, and the "sshd" check with the "admins" group:
#    PROC httpd 5 GROUP=web
#    PROC sshd 1 GROUP=admins
# In the alerts.cfg file, you could then have rules like
#    GROUP=web
#       MAIL webmaster@foo.com
#    GROUP=admins
#       MAIL root@foo.com
#
# Qualifiers must be placed after each rule, e.g.
#    LOAD 8.0 12.0  HOST=db.foo.com TIME=*:0800:1600
#
# If you have multiple rules that you want to apply the same qualifiers to,
# you can write the qualifiers *only* on one line, followed by the rules. E.g.
#    HOST=%db.*.foo.com TIME=W:0800:1600
#       LOAD 8.0 12.0
#       DISK /db  98 100
#       PROC mysqld 1
# will apply the three rules to all of the "db" hosts on week-days between 8AM
# and 4PM. This can be combined with per-rule qualifiers, in which case the
# per-rule qualifier overrides the general qualifier; e.g.
#    HOST=%.*.foo.com
#       LOAD 7.0 12.0 HOST=bax.foo.com
#       LOAD 3.0 8.0
# will result in the load-limits being 7.0/12.0 for the "bax.foo.com" host,
# and 3.0/8.0 for all other foo.com hosts.
#
# The special DEFAULT section can modify the built-in defaults - this must
# be placed at the end of the file.

DEFAULT
	# These are the built-in defaults.
	UP      1h
	LOAD    5.0 10.0
	DISK    * 90 95
	MEMPHYS 100 101
	MEMSWAP 50 80
	MEMACT  90 97